Traditional Office Lease Vs. Coworking Private Office

Traditional Office Lease Vs. Coworking Private Office

by Mark Fornasiero

Now that we have finally dug out of the last of our lockdown restrictions, people are looking to make some long-term decisions about how and where they will work. We know that commuting to a central office five days a week is not in the cards for many people. But continuing to have a separate place to work outside of your home is still essential for your mental health, for maintaining a healthy boundary between your work and family life, and as a productivity tool. (No distractions like the fridge, Netflix, laundry or pets when you are at an office!)

If you’re trying to decide between renting your own private office for you and your team or opting for a managed office space like you’d find in a coworking location, here are a few things to keep in mind:

FLEXIBILITY

Coworking memberships are designed to be flexible, with no long-term commitments like you will find in a regular office lease from a traditional landlord. Typically, an office membership at a shared space is between 6 to 12 months in length. Businesses change, the environment changes (as we know) and knowing that you aren’t on the hook for a 5-year lease will give you great peace of mind.  

MORE THAN JUST 4 WALLS

When you take a private office in a coworking space you get much more than four walls and a door. You get access to a great community of like-minded people who value community and are serious about getting work done. At ACE we have a full calendar of events to support our members’ wellness, social life, educational opportunities and business growth. Of course, you can make as much use of these events as you choose. Whether a member likes to attend a little of everything or prefers to keep their head down and work, it’s nice to know the opportunity to connect is there if they want it.

SPACE & OPTIONS

A good shared office space will have lots of places for you and your team to work other than just your office. Boardrooms, lounges, café areas and phone booths are all at your finger tips at ACE Coworking and at most well-appointed spaces. Make sure you book a tour before signing up to check all these out.

PEACE OF MIND

If you’re considering an office lease with a traditional landlord, don’t forget that you will still have a lot of other expenses and jobs ahead: you’ll need to arrange your own internet service, cleaning service, schedule the purchase of coffee and office supplies, buy renters’ insurance, and be available when the Amazon delivery shows up. A good coworking space will often have a couple of internet providers to make sure you’re always connected and definitely have someone on site to handle the inevitable IT problems that pop up.

IN A NUTSHELL:

Finding the best way to work as we enter this new, exciting future is an important decision. Make sure you take a holistic view of all the factors that will affect where and how you work. Most coworking spaces with private offices will offer a free trial day where you can see if a shared workspace is a good fit for you. That is probably the best thing you can do to help you make a choice between a fixed, long-term lease and a flexible membership-based shared office space.

 

Mark Fornasiero is the co-founder of ACE Coworking and the creator of The Clear Insight Program. An avid practitioner of mindfulness meditation, Mark also provides professional consulting to entrepreneurs looking to launch and operate their own independent coworking spaces.

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Your Small Business Can Grow… even during a pandemic!

Your Small Business Can Grow… even during a pandemic!

It’s Small Business Month, so we thought it would be the perfect time to invite Mark to share a few thoughts on how your small business can grow and flourish, even during a pandemic… 

The SME sector in Canada is the engine of our economy. The BDC reports that over 98% of all private companies in Canada have fewer than 100 employees and employ 70% of the entire private sector (learn more here). So, while a few big companies get all the hype, pretty much everyone you know is working for, or owns, a small business. 

What I want to focus on here is the 75% of all employers who have 10 or fewer employees and generate less than $1 million in revenue. What is it about those two numbers – 10 employees and $1 million in revenue – that seems to cap the growth of the majority of small businesses? 

Lack of ‘Infrastructure’ Investing 

As companies start to bump up against that employee count (10) and revenue number ($1 million), the demands on the owner become almost unbearable. She is likely involved in every aspect of the business: selling, operations, hiring, training, keeping the books, etc. What seemed manageable (but an awful lot of work) in the early start-up period of the company has become impossible to accomplish in a 24-hour day now. The only way to get over this hurdle is to invest in what I call ‘infrastructure’ that supports the business. This usually means hiring someone to run the operational side of the company – a general manager or operations manager, for example. That new role will also require some additional investments in software support (financial or HR, maybe) or other tools. I know, it sounds expensive. That’s exactly why this step is usually avoided, and the company’s growth stalls. 

Learning to Let Go 

Besides the perceived cost, there’s another barrier I see all the time: a company can’t grow if the owner doesn’t give up some control and power. Letting go can be very difficult for a founder-owner. They’ve built the company from the ground up; they know where every dime goes and who does what. The problem is they can only keep track of every detail of what people are doing up to a point. That point is up until they have around 10 employees. (Usually fewer, in fact.) So, if you want to grow your business, you’ll need an operational or management team to support you. And that means you need to make the energetic choice to let go of some control. This will require a significant shift in your mindset.

“Cost” vs. “Investment” Mindset

When I suggest to owners that it’s time to start paying for operational and infrastructure support, the trigger response is often, “Are you kidding? I can’t afford that!” I’m not suggesting you start spending your hard-earned profits irresponsibly. What I am suggesting is that you need to think of these potential spends in terms of investments. If you need to spend $50,000 to hire a manager, what kind of return can you expect on that investment? If turning the day-to-day operations over to someone else frees up your time to go out and sell more of your product or service, search out new markets, find joint-venture partners, or design new products, then you can calculate whether this investment will generate a worthwhile return. But, if you see every dollar that goes the door as an expense – one that needs to be reduced to the bare minimum – then you’ll never put yourself in the growth mindset that you need to get over that elusive $1 million revenue hurdle.

Is growth possible without relinquishing some control, building a support team, and adopting an investment mindset? Maybe, but in 20 years in business, I haven’t seen it happen. I’d love to hear your thoughts on this topic. Please share in the comments.

 

 

Mark Fornasiero is the co-founder of ACE Coworking and an independent consultant specializing in growth-and-exit strategies for privately-held enterprises. Mark also provides professional consulting to entrepreneurs looking to launch and operate their own independent coworking spaces.